M: Check Your Phone at the Gate

June 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

This article provides a somewhat humorous, yet real, look at the effect of communication technology on human interactions. Volunteers at the Memorial Golf Tournament in Dublin, Ohio ask each spectator whether they have cellular telephones upon entrance to the course. PGA rules prohibit cell phones on courses during tournaments to prevent golfers from being distracted. Increasingly, spectators are seen in possession of phones around the greens. The article provides an excellent backdrop for helping individuals realize how technology can intrude and inhibit effective interactions.

QUESTIONS:

M1. When volunteer John Massara says, “Everyone lies,” it is a serious indictment on human behavior. Discuss the general importance of credibility in communication and talk about the factors (even in the article) that might lead Mr. Massara to be skeptical.

M2. What communication barrier does a ringing cell phone represent when two (or more) people are interacting? Why is this a problem?

M3. Although not a problem related to the article, technology is changing the way we communicate in positive and negative ways. Consider the implications of cell phones. Discuss this issue in the general sense of how texting is affecting communication and in terms of how the choice of channel influences communication effectiveness.

    SOURCE: K. L. Gray, “No Phone? Sure,” Columbus Dispatch (Retrievable online at http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2010/06/05/no-phonesure.html)

    Related video clip:

    M: Legendary Leadership

    June 7, 2010 by  
    Filed under Uncategorized

    When John Wooden died June 4, 2010 at the age of 99, the basketball community lost a living legend. As coach of the UCLA Bruins, Coach Wooden experienced unprecedented (and unduplicated) success. As a player, he won a national championship at Purdue University. He was a three-time All-American. As a coach, he won 10 national championships in 12 years (including 7 in a row). From 1971-74, his teams won an NCAA basketball record 88 consecutive games. He accomplished this, in some cases, with superstar players and, in others, with brilliant teamwork. In 40 seasons of coaching, he had only one losing season (his first). He is the only person to be inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame as both a player and a coach.

    QUESTIONS:

    M1. Read the full article. As you do, develop a list of traits that made John Wooden an effective leader. What are the top three traits that you believe would generalize to any leader in any situation?

    M2. Coach Wooden definitely had a dominant leadership style. What was it (i.e., task-motivated or relationship-motivated)? Examine Fiedler’s Contingency Theory and identify the things Wooden did that ultimately translated into success.

    M3. In what ways did Coach Wooden embody Drucker’s “Old-Fashioned” Leadership?

    M4. Now examine the models of change leadership and Figure 10.2. What are the key factors that moved Coach Wooden from a “status quo manager” to the kind of leader he needed to be to achieve consistent success?

      SOURCE: B. Dwyre & D. Wharton, “John Wooden Dies at 99,” Los Angeles Times (Retrievable online at http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-john-woodenlong-20100605,0,409375.story)

      See also: D. Wharton & C. Foster, “John Wooden’s Words Live On in the Hearts of His Admirers,” Los Angeles Times (Retrievable online at http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-0606-john-wooden-20100606,0,2447678.story)

      Related video clip:

      M: When Leadership Is Lacking

      June 1, 2010 by  
      Filed under Uncategorized

      A recent poll shows Americans are gaining confidence about economic recovery, but still harbor much anger toward politicians. Many indicate they would prefer to elect individuals without experience in Congress in order to break free from the status quo.

      QUESTIONS:

      M1. Examine the Leader-Participation Model and the three rules for making decisions. How should these rules influence the way politicians vote? Are any of these rules contributing to how the public feels about politicians at the moment?

      M2. One could argue that President Barack Obama swept into office on the strength of his vision and charisma. Yet dissatisfaction with politicians suggests that Congress is anything but transformational in terms of leadership. Discuss what our nation’s political leaders must do to be effective transformational leaders.

      M3. Step out of the main portion of the chapter and review the Learning About Yourself feature on integrity. Does integrity have anything to do with the way Americans in general feel about politicians (as leaders)? How?

        SOURCE: S. Page, “Poll Finds Anger Over Country’s Leaders,” USA Today (Retrievable online at http://www.usatoday.com/news/washington/2010-05-27-poll_N.htm)

        M: Controlling Education

        June 1, 2010 by  
        Filed under Uncategorized

        We typically think about control in terms of processes. However, control can apply to individual behavior by controlling (constraining) choices. In the case of Ivan Cantera, his mother’s choice of his high school left him in an environment with strict controls that ultimately ensured his success. For former girlfriend Laura Corro, the choice to go the standard route left her with little control and, now, little direction as to her future.

        QUESTIONS:

        M1. Take the definition for control and apply it to the present situation. In other words, how does control work in the case of Ivan Cantera?

        M2. What types of controls are utilized by Santa Fe South High School?

        M3. What control mechanism (broad option and specific type) is in place at Santa Fe South? Can you argue that this type of mechanism might influence another control mechanism?

        M4. Discuss how the differences in discipline systems at Santa Fe South and Capitol Hill lead to different results in terms of student performance.

          SOURCE: M. Jordan, “A Tale of Two Students,” Wall Street Journal (Retrievable online at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704717004575268752238805736.html)